Adriana Esteves: “Harrassment Allowed Me to Channel My Screams into a Project”

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Crédito: Globo/Ramón Vasconcelos

by Sebastián Amoroso the 08/02/2019
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Interviewed by ttvnews, the star of Globo’s miniseries Harrassment discusses crucial aspects of the story written by Maria Camargo and directed by Amora Mautner, prior to its screening at the 2019 Berlinale.

The miniseries Harrassment, a production by Globo exclusively available on its Globoplay streaming service, will be screened in the upcoming Berlinale festival.

The screening will be held next Tuesday, Feb. 12, at 11am in Zoo Palast (Clubkino A) during the Drama Series Days Market Screening, which showcases new content to programmers from different platforms across the world.  

Harrassment

Before the screening, Adriana Esteves, star of the miniseries written by Maria Camargo and directed by Amora Mautner told ttvnews about key aspects related to her performance and this story based on actual events.

How would you define the story told in this miniseries?

Acoso is a fictitious tale loosely inspired on the book A Clínica: A Farsa e os Crimes de Roger Abdelmassih, by Vicente Vilardaga. It is based on actual events, the story of a prestigious doctor in the field of in vitro fertilization, who sexually abused and raped his female patients for years. There came a point when all the victims came together and, with the help of social media, managed to report the case, which led to the search and arrest of the physician by the police, sparking one of the biggest scandals to ever be printed by the press.

The protagonist falls victim of harrassment, a relevant issue across the world right now, with the Me Too movement as flagship. How did you prepare for the role?

It was something I was aware of, and something that I obviously found outrageous. My job was to go more in depth. I read and studied the book which chronicled every single detail of the case, and started my research on these women’s sorrow.

What challenges did you face as the lead?

The miniseries was written by Maria Camargo and directed by Amora Mautner, two female creators. The cast, along with our male lead Antonio Calloni (La guerrera y India - Una historia de amor), is made up of brilliant Brazilian artists. It was a great exercise in sorority. Women that came together to narrate and dennounce a heart-breaking story, with multiple victims cruelly abused at an extremely sensitive moment of their lives, when they were trying to get their children some medicine. For me, it was a chance to join a project through which to channel my screaming, feelings and ideas.

What are the implications of doing a scripted show for an OTT service? What was different from your work in telenovelas like Nuevo Sol and Avenida Brasil?

Joining a short-lasting project is very gratifying. Telenovelas shoot for almost an entire year and demand a lot from you.

What does the screening of Harassment in a world-class festival like Berlinale signify?

It is quite an honor. Berlinale is a festival I respect a great deal, mainly because it brings to forefront social and political issues. This year, I happen to appear in two pieces slated to screen during the festival: the miniseries Harrassment and Wagner Moura’s feature Marighella, which is debuting in Berlin. I’m very proud of both.

What did Avenida Brasil’s success in Brazil and abroad meant for your acting career?

The popularity of Avenida Brasil and, consequently, of my character has intensified my desire and likelihood of working somewhere else, even outside Brazil.

What other TV projects do you have for 2019?

In 2019, I’ll star in Lázaro Ramos’s directorial debut. During the second half of the year, I’ll feature in a new telenovela written by Manuela Dias and directed by José Luiz Villamarim, writer and director of the series Justicia.

What other projects can you tell us about?

I have two projects for 2020: acting in a play and appearing in a movie that si still at an early development stage. I’m still working on the script with two screenwriters.

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